Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Monday, February 19, 2018

Take an Expedition to the Galapagos Islands

You can visit and explore the unique landscapes, waters and species of the Galápagos Islands with National Geographic Expeditions. Learn more here.

READ MORE about traveling to the Galapagos Islands


Monday, February 12, 2018

Good Night Little Turtle

Check out "Good Night Little Turtle" children's book available on Amazon.




Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Common Turtle Diseases

















Common Turtle Diseases

To help pet owners, here's a quick overview of the diseases affecting turtles:


Deficiencies (vitamins): to be cured, vary your turtle's food and let them sunbathe!

Deficiency (calcium and UVB): a balanced diet will prevent calcium deficiencies. The lack of calcium or ultraviolet rays (direct contact with sunlight) makes the turtle amorphous and softens its shell (which is called a "toblerone shell").


TOBLERONE SHELL:

Constipation: caused by dry food, you must  bathe the turtle in warm water several times a day and give them high-fibre food. If nothing progresses, you can give them a little paraffin oil.

Diarrhea: the origins are different (intestinal parasite, thermatique shock, dietary imbalance) and this disorder may just be a phase if the turtle continues to feed and live normally.

Dehydration: To prevent it, the turtle should always have access to water. A turtle with sunken eyes and no urine is probably dehydrated.

VARIOUS DISEASES:

Anorexia: a sick turtle will tend not to eat. And anorexia is often the result of other diseases. Anorexia can also be caused by  stress due to a change of environment (new enclosure, death of a partner) or a food that does not fit them.

Pneumonia: only a vet can determine the cause of pneumonia, which can be viral, bacterial, parasitic ... It may be pneumonia if the turtle breathes loudly, if it is weak or anorexic.

Rhinitis causes nostrils flows - the turtle should be dewormed before being treated with antibiotics if rhinitique comes from mycoplasma.

Sepsis caused by an untreated infection that is spreading throughout the body. The turtle is then slaughtered with red spots observed on its members or its plastron.

Stomatitis: infection occurring in the oral cavity, usually out of hibernation or when the turtle is very weak. When the tongue is reached this is called glossitis, causing anorexia and salivation.

Abscess: localized collection of pus in the skin of the turtle necessarily leads to surgery.

Dermatitis humidity: terrarium turtles can suffer from excess of moisture which causes small blisters to appear on the skin or on the shell. Treat by applying betadine on the affected areas.

Retention of eggs: a female turtle too stressed or not finding a quiet place to dig does not lay her eggs. The turtle will be restless and often anorexic. Take her to a veterinarian.

PARASITES:

Ticks: as soon as you notice a tick, it should be soaked in ether and then extracted. It is recommended to apply an antiseptic lotion where the tick was sucking blood for several days.

Myiasis: they are caused by fly larvae settling under the skin which sometimes creates deep wounds. You need to call a vet.

Protozoa and worms: should be avoided with anti-worm treatment.

Friday, February 2, 2018

My Cousin: The Diamondback Terrapin

Can this guy get any more handsome? Look at his markings!

























The Diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin) was once almost pushed to extinction due to a fashion among some members of American society for turtle meat, a trend that thankfully died out before this terrapin did.

The Diamondback terrapin has an oblong upper shell (carapace) that is grey, light brown or black and patterned with concentric diamond-shapes. The shell on the underside of the terrapin (the plastron) can range in colour from yellowish to green or black, and may be decorated with bold, dark markings.

The grey or black skin of the limbs and head bears dark flecks and spots, the head is short and flat, and the prominent eyes are black. The large, webbed feet are adapted for swimming, but also bear strong claws that allow the terrapin to clamber up out of the water. Female diamondback terrapins are larger than the males, and have a broader head and shorter tail. Juveniles are patterned much like adults but usually brighter and have rounder shells.

The diamondback terrapin is native to the United States, where they can be found along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts from Cape Cod to Texas. The diamondback terrapin inhabits the brackish waters of coastal marshes, tidal flats, coves, estuaries and coastal lagoons.

The Diamondback terrapin is believed to be the only turtle in the world that lives exclusively in brackish water (containing some salt, but not as much as ocean water), habitats like tidal marshes, estuaries and lagoons. Most terrapins hibernate during the winter by burrowing into the mud of marshes.

Although not endangered, declines in population are a result of drowning in commercial crab pots and is the major threat to the Diamondback terrapin, while coastal development interrupts nesting beaches.